Alligator Season begins today

Alligator Season begins today

Here in the Sunshine State, there’s a Gator Season each summer that lasts for 30 days. The season opens today.

If you’d like to know more about gator hunting in these parts,  here’s a bulletin from our Fish And Wildlife Commission where you can get up to date on Gator Season if you wish.

I do hold a Hunting and Fishing license but won’t be out looking for gator hide this year. Don’t have the boat; don’t have the gear!

And you do need to pull tags for gators specifically, as you do in Florida for most game.

Haven’t done it, not likely I ever will but I’m thinking it’s about as intense as hunting gets.

For those of us who aren’t likely to ever join in for real, Swamp People on the History Channel is always an option!

 

Power-relaxing in F-L-A today, I am,

Bulldog Ben Basile

 

Photo credit Ben Lawrence Basile

 

 

Help for the Eastern Indigo Snake

Help for the Eastern Indigo Snake

One of Florida’s iconic snakes, the Eastern Indigo has been having a tough time in the last little while. The problems are familiar and are not so easily remedied in a time where it seems like every square inch of habitat in Florida has a strip mall or three either being built on it or in the planning stage.

But the good guys are doing what they can to keep our native species from fading to black. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission has a comprehensive plan to address this unhappy situation and the state expends a lot of resources to work that plan.

One of the many actions taken recently to help the Eastern Indigo Snake in particular was the release of 20 captive-bred specimens into the wild at the Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve in Liberty County. That’s in the panhandle region of Florida.

Just how much help this will be to the Eastern Indigo is impossible to tell, but it certainly can’t hurt. The loss of habitat is problem no. 1 facing all of our native wildlife here in the Sunshine State, and though it seems cliché, it’s nevertheless true that the problem is only going to get worse before it gets better.

Well, human nature being what it is, I don’t think it will ever get better, but that’s fodder for a different posting.

For now, I’m glad to see that our FWC is doing fine work, helping to give our native species a fighting chance.

To read the entire press release about today’s very cool event, just follow this link.

 

 

“Bulldog Ben” Basile

 

© 2018 Ben Lawrence Basile

 

Photo credit Ben Lawrence Basile

 

 

Headed Back to Tosohatchee Next Saturday

Headed Back to Tosohatchee Next Saturday

The Tosohatchee Wildlife Management Area is, by far, the closest of Florida’s WMA’s to my neck of the woods. I loved the afternoon I spent there back on January 4th and so I was happy to see that our FWC is planning an event at Tosohatchee in about a week’s time to give the nature lovers among us a chance to see one of our WMA’s up close!

Hunting and fishing are two activities that happen a lot on our WMA’s here in the Sunshine State but hikers, campers and birders love them, too. And if you get a chance to come out next Saturday, the 27th, Rangers and other staff with the Fish and Wildlife Commission can get you up to speed on all the reasons to visit Tosohatchee or any one of Florida’s WMA’s.

To see the PR release from Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Commission about this free and family-friendly event, just follow this handy link.

 

“Bulldog Ben” Basile

 

 

Photo credit Benjamin Lawrence Basile

 

Fish and Wildlife Commission Sets Aside a New Conservation Area

Fish and Wildlife Commission Sets Aside a New Conservation Area

Our FWC here in Florida is always engaged in doing things to protect wildlife and make it easier for Floridians to learn about and enjoy it.

In fact, to me, our Fish and Wildlife Commission is just about the only arm of state government here that I have complete confidence in. They do a lot of good work.

The commission released a PR bulletin today to let the public know that they’ve created a new Critical Wildlife Area in Volusia County. It’s called the Port Orange Colony and though it’s not of considerable size–being a bit less than two acres–it is, nevertheless, a very important site for many bird species. An incomplete list includes the tricolored heron, great egrets, the American oystercatcher and the brown pelican.

It seems to this nature lover to be a very significant action by the commission and the FWC chairman has said as much. Here’s what chairman Brian Yablonski said in today’s release about the creation of our newest CWA here in the Sunshine State:

“Protecting Florida’s birds is what gave rise to the conservation movement in the United States. This is a legacy moment that we leave for the ages as a Commission.”

Kudos to Florida’s FWC for this and all the fine work they do. To read the complete press release all about the Port Orange Colony, our newest conservation area, follow this link.

 

 

“Bulldog Ben” Basile

 

 

Photo credit Benjamin Lawrence Basile